Jesus Christ (Meant to Be) the Superstar

March 10, 2014  •  Leave a Comment

I know from my own experiences and from those of very dear friends that pastor, preacher, mentor worship can become a creeping sin that overcomes you before you know it. It's vital that we keep our own minds deeply rooted in God's word. Now that isn't to say that we should not listen and take in the wisdom from those who are inspired by God, live out God's word, and teach according to the word. At the same time, we must be mature enough to know what the bible said from our own personal walk with God.

Every Christian is given the gift of the Holy Spirit to ascertain the meaning and understand exactly what God's message means in their own lives at that particular time of application (1 Corinthians 2:6-16). The most important factor is in whom we place our trust. If we are solely focused on what a person says instead of the source that provided the wisdom, we can fall into religious traps that keep us from seeing God's truth (Proverbs 3:5-8).

Having a consistent, daily prayer & meditation time with God will strengthen our mind. It will give us a keen awareness when someone, even those teachers that we love, speak for themselves and not of God's direction.

~~
twh

March 10: Jesus Christ (Meant to Be) the Superstar

John 17:1–26

Andrew Lloyd Webber’s musical, Jesus Christ Superstar, is certainly incorrect (and rather heretical) in its portrayal of history, but it got one thing right: Jesus is meant to be the celebrity. He—no one else—is the Savior, the Christ, the Lord.

And that’s why the celebrity pastor movement is quite frightening. I don’t say this as a cynic, and it’s not that I’m primarily concerned with how these teachers are marketed (although that, too, can be scary at times); I’m worried about the way they’re received.

Certainly there are people who can be trusted more than others, and popularity is by no means a measurement of trustworthiness. But automatically agreeing with everything a teacher says puts the disciple in a bad position with the God they worship. It also puts the teacher in a position similar to an idol. Teachers who truly follow Christ would never desire such glory for themselves.

In the Gospel of John, we see Jesus glorified by the Father. Jesus was obedient to the Father, even to death, which is why He alone is worthy of our worship. “I have glorified you on earth by completing the work that you have given me to do. And now, Father, you glorify me at your side with the glory that I had at your side before the world existed” (John 17:4–5).

True teachers of the gospel want commitment—not to themselves, but to Christ and His cause. Jesus prayed: “Righteous Father, although the world does not know you, yet I have known you, and these men have come to know that you sent me. And I made known to them your name, and will make it known, in order that the love with which you loved me may be in them, and I may be in them” (John 17:26).

In what parts of your life is God asking you to make a statement similar to Paul’s? What teachers are you adoring too much? - John D. Barry

Barry, J. D., & Kruyswijk, R. (2012). Connect the Testaments: A Daily Devotional. Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press.

 


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